Section: Human interest

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Confronting or erasing history?

Clark Renney
History

Striking a balance between confronting and erasing history isn’t easy – we must understand, but resist the urge to rewrite. Clark Renney looks at how this is being approach in the UK and USA.

Review: James O’Brien, How not to be wrong

Jayson Winters

Many will know of James O’Brien from his national 10am to 1pm weekday radio show on LBC. To borrow one of his phrases, “depending on which football shirt you are wearing” you’ll probably either think of him as a champion of progressive politics or a patronising woke lefty.  But look back to when LBC was […]

“IDAHOBIT” day: progress for LGBT+ rights stalls

Bryan Manley-Green

t’s hard to believe that it’s just 31 years ago, on 17 May 1990, that the World Health Organisation finally declassified homosexuality as a mental disorder. This important date was subsequently chosen as International Day Against Homophobia, which first took place in 2005.

Bringing European music to schools

Ann C Holland

In 1992 we lived and worked in Dorset. A beautiful count where I was Deputy Head of Lytchett Minster School.

Two of my colleagues were language teachers and together, we decided to create a European fortnight of theatre, music and food to celebrate the Union. Most of the staff and students got involved, and we produced several Spanish and French plays, held three concerts and hosted a Brazilian/Portuguese dance group who happened to be visiting Bournemouth.

The day the music died

Ann C Holland

The stark change to the lives of the UK’s musicians and actors is heartbreaking. Prior to 31 December 2020, lockdown aside, a musician could jump onto Eurostar, pass speedily into France or Belgium and carry their instrument without paperwork, tariffs or red tape to their venue. Maybe for a week, maybe for a whole season. Post-Brexit, only 90 days is permissible.

The Death of Dalian Atkinson

Anna Girolami

Last year in Minneapolis, a black man was killed by a white US police officer. Two weeks ago, officer Derek Chauvin was convicted of the murder of George Floyd in a landmark court case that was reported around the world and hailed by the US president himself as a “giant step forward” against systemic racism […]

Just not cricket

Anna Girolami

Today is 4th May, we are deep into spring. This year’s county cricket season is three weeks’ old and Derbyshire is already languishing at the bottom of their group. Despite Covid-19, despite the Big Bash League, despite the razzamatazz of the Indian Premier League*, cricket remains the quintessential game of the English summer. The gentle […]

Changes to EU citizens’ rights should concern us all

Mark Vaughan

For decades, EU citizens had the right under EU free movement law to live their lives in the UK but now must ask for permission to continue to do so by applying to the EU Settlement Scheme. From today, they only have 90 days left until the application deadline of 30 June, after which many […]

The conversation men should have with each other

Simon Ferrigno

When I was 16, I witnessed a sexual assault. At school, of all places. This was in the 1980s, early on. I knew this was wrong but I had no idea how to deal with it. There were several of us around, mostly male. Most of us were probably as uncomfortable as I was. A slightly older boy grabbed a young woman who was passing by, touched her, pushed her. Laughing. Said she was asking for it.

Whisper who dares

Anna Girolami

We will have no recourse when the police silence us. No-one will have to resign or explain.


11 days ago, Sarah Everard disappeared in Clapham at about 9.30 pm. She was walking home from a friend’s house.

Vauxhall Motors

Ann C Holland

The company owner now is Stellantis, a merger of Fiat-Chrysler and Peugeot. The plant could be left empty. They could go for an electric car but the future looks as grim as it has for some time. Just in time supply chains won’t necessarily work with Brexit and Covid-19.

The End of the Line?

Richard Hall

Dysfunctional families have long been the bane of sections of the British media and society – hated for their anti-social ‘f*** you’ behaviour, their casual attitudes towards marriage, their dependency on state handouts and the sometimes very disreputable characters they associate themselves with.

A Sense of Identity: National Identity and the coming Census

Cate Earnshaw Dudley

Every decade a census is taken in England and Wales. This snapshot of all people and households gives information to help plan resource allocation, and will help future historians understand us. This year, there is a lot of chatter on social media asking the question ‘Do you feel European?’ with speculation whether we should, or […]

Travel free roaming for 47 years of my life

Ann C Holland

As a geographer and scientist I have spent my life viewing the scene and travelling wherever I could. Born in Ellesmere Port, aged 4, a friend and I regularly tricycled down to the Dock Basin where the Shropshire Union Canal met the Manchester Ship Canal. Today the Boat Museum is a major tourist attraction, whilst […]

Review: On This Day She: putting women back into history, one day at a time

Jayson Winters

Progressives are frequently accused of the desire to ‘cancel’, for example, by tearing down statues of slave traders or denying a speaking platform to those with unsavoury or dangerous opinions. During a period where the Government can’t find time to legally award and report on multi-million pound contracts, it has found time to announce its […]

LGBT+ History Month: More relevant than ever

Bryan Manley-Green

Since launching in the UK in February 2005 LGBT+ History Month has become an increasingly important time for the country to take stock of a largely hidden and multi-faceted strand of history. The UK version was set up by School’s Out,  initially to help schoolteachers but now reaching a much wider audience with events taking […]